Medical Travel Today Feature on Patrick C. Toy, M.D.

Since 1909, Campbell Clinic has provided unsurpassed patient care and has been recognized as the leader in teaching and research in orthopaedic surgery. The doctors at Campbell Clinic are dedicated to their patients and are always looking for ways to better serve them through advancing orthopaedic techniques.Dr. Patrick Toy Campbell Clinic

Dr. Patrick Toy is no exception to these doctors. Starting to perform direct anterior total hip replacement surgery at Campbell Surgery Center in 2013, Dr. Toy has allowed some patients to undergo this surgery in an outpatient setting. He has treated patients from all over the world, and is often looked at for consideration by patients wanting hip replacement surgery.

“I joined the Campbell Clinic staff as an orthopaedic surgeon in 2009 after completing a fellowship at The University of Florida,” said Toy. “Prior to that, I obtained my medical degree at The University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis, Tennessee, in 2003 and finished a residency through the UT- Campbell Clinic program in 2008. My areas of specialty include total joint replacement surgery- both hips and knees- as well as sports medicine and orthopaedic oncology.”

Campbell Clinic is an innovator in the field of orthopaedic surgery, and that’s something that’s stayed true for over a century. Campbell Clinic is a full-service orthopaedic practice, and specializes in sports medicine, total joint replacement, as well as the treatment of all musculoskeletal injuries and diseases.

Total joint replacement surgery has emerged as a high-demand orthopaedic procedure, thanks to the large number of baby boomer patients, who are now in their 50s, 60s, and 70s,” said Toy.

The main concern coming from these patients is that they will have to spend several days or weeks in the hospital, with some even worrying they won’t be able to return to physical activity after they have had their surgery. Dr. Toy offers good news to those patients.

“Surgery can now be performed on an outpatient basis for some patients, and most athletes can return to low-impact, moderate fitness activities if they take the recommended precautions,” said Toy.

Campbell Clinic normally treats more than 180,000 patients per year and is one of only a few centers in the U.S. that offers same-day, outpatient joint replacement. With several hundred patients receiving outpatient joint replacement last year at Campbell Clinic, Toy predicts this is where the future of this industry is headed.

“As more and more surgeons develop protocols to move eligible cases into the outpatient setting, this is going to become a more popular and accessible option for patients.”

This article originally appeared on Medical Travel Today.

Children’s Throwing Injuries in the Elbow

As baseball and softball seasons reach their peaks, doctors often see an increase in young athletes’ elbow problems. The human elbow is a joint made up of three bones (humerus, radius and ulna), and held together by muscles, ligaments and tendons. The combination hinge and pivot joint allows the arm to properly bend and rotate. Several muscles, nerves and tendons cross paths at the elbow.

The most common elbow issue in children is medial apophysitis, also known as “Little Leaguer’s elbow.” With this injury, the athlete will likely feel pain along the bump on the inside of the elbow. “Little Leaguer’s elbow” can become a serious issue if left untreated. The condition occurs when tendons and ligaments are repetitively pulled through excessive throwing. In serious cases, the repeated pulling motions can tear away tiny bone fragments, which can disrupt bone growth.

A less common elbow injury that may occur is osteochondritis dissecans. This condition is also caused by excessive throwing patterns, and involves compression of the elbow and the joint smashing immature bones together. This can loosen the bone and cartilage.

A child should stop throwing if any of the following symptoms appear:

  • Elbow pain
  • Restricted range of motion
  • Locking of the elbow joint

These conditions can be treated both non-surgically and surgically, although the latter of the two is not nearly as common.

Non-surgical Treatment

  • Continuing to throw will only further aggravate the elbow.
  • Cold compresses will help eliminate swelling.
  • Alter the child’s throwing technique. If pain persists or gets worse, stop the activity entirely until the child is treated by a physician.

Surgical Treatment

Depending on the severity of the injury, surgery may be necessary to remove loose bone fragments or reattach a ligament onto a bone.

If your child has an elbow injury, please contact Campbell Clinic to meet with a physician. For more information about Campbell Clinic, please visit our website.

This blog post was adapted from AAOS.