It’s Men’s Health Month: How healthy are you?

Taking care of your health at any age is important, but throughout the month of June, anchored by a Congressional health education program, screenings, health education and outreach activities are being pushed to inform men on what they could be at risk for and what they need to improve on as a part of Men’s Health Month.

The goal of this month is to spread awareness of early detection and treatment of health issues among men, encouraging regular check-ups and general education about overall health.

Men’s Health Month is symbolized by the color blue, with Wear Blue Day taking place June 16. People are encouraged to wear blue on this day in support of the Month, creating a better understanding of some of the issues that men face.

Did you know?

  • Heart disease is the leading cause of death among men, with cancer not too far behind.
  • On average, men live five years less than women.
  • Approximately 30,000 men in the U.S. die each year from prostate cancer. Men who lead active lifestyles with prostate cancer have a better survival rate than those who are not active. Regular physical activity has great health impacts on overall health, and men who demonstrate three or more hours of healthy exercise actually lower their risk of prostate cancer by 61 percent.

Bone and joint problems vary by gender, meaning treatment and recovery are different for both men and women. This month, make it a point to set up an appointment if you’re feeling any aches or pains. Not receiving the proper treatment only allows for aliments to worsen.

Below are a few orthopedic conditions that men are at higher risk for.

  • Fractures in their fingers and hands.
  • Complications with osteoporosis and hip fractures, developing conditions like pneumonia and systemic infections after a hip fracture.
  • More likely to have a soft-tissue injury like tears to an Achilles tendon or an arm-muscle injury.
  • Men, as they get older, can develop not only osteoporosis, but also rheumatoid arthritis and thyroid problems.

If you or anyone you know is experiencing any of these orthopedic issues, please contact Campbell Clinic to meet with a physician. For more information, visit our website.

For more information on Men’s Health Month, visit: www.menshealthmonth.org.

Children’s Throwing Injuries in the Elbow

As baseball and softball seasons reach their peaks, doctors often see an increase in young athletes’ elbow problems. The human elbow is a joint made up of three bones (humerus, radius and ulna), and held together by muscles, ligaments and tendons. The combination hinge and pivot joint allows the arm to properly bend and rotate. Several muscles, nerves and tendons cross paths at the elbow.

The most common elbow issue in children is medial apophysitis, also known as “Little Leaguer’s elbow.” With this injury, the athlete will likely feel pain along the bump on the inside of the elbow. “Little Leaguer’s elbow” can become a serious issue if left untreated. The condition occurs when tendons and ligaments are repetitively pulled through excessive throwing. In serious cases, the repeated pulling motions can tear away tiny bone fragments, which can disrupt bone growth.

A less common elbow injury that may occur is osteochondritis dissecans. This condition is also caused by excessive throwing patterns, and involves compression of the elbow and the joint smashing immature bones together. This can loosen the bone and cartilage.

A child should stop throwing if any of the following symptoms appear:

  • Elbow pain
  • Restricted range of motion
  • Locking of the elbow joint

These conditions can be treated both non-surgically and surgically, although the latter of the two is not nearly as common.

Non-surgical Treatment

  • Continuing to throw will only further aggravate the elbow.
  • Cold compresses will help eliminate swelling.
  • Alter the child’s throwing technique. If pain persists or gets worse, stop the activity entirely until the child is treated by a physician.

Surgical Treatment

Depending on the severity of the injury, surgery may be necessary to remove loose bone fragments or reattach a ligament onto a bone.

If your child has an elbow injury, please contact Campbell Clinic to meet with a physician. For more information about Campbell Clinic, please visit our website.

This blog post was adapted from AAOS.